How I became a Christian – Part 2


Hell on Earth (album)

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I spoke of my “Fall” in the convenience store. Now we’ll look at the ramifications. As a kid, I never questioned the existence of God, even though it wasn’t something that was necessarily preached to me. I would not have classified myself as a “born-again” person as a child in any sense of the term.  As I grew, I became less apt to follow my conscience and more inclined to do whatever I felt like doing, just so long that I could get away with it.

My parents unfortunately became addicted to alcohol as I got older.  I took the streets with my friends, playing wiffle-ball, basketball and doing goofy stuff that kids do, mostly to keep away from my house as much as possible.

We moved to another neighborhood around the time I turned 13, and that was about the time I became an atheist. I began to ask questions about life’s meaning. In my observation, life seemed so utterly meaningless. Because my family situation was becoming increasingly chaotic with all the drinking, and because of what I learned in school about Darwinian evolution (primordial-soup-to-people through an unguided process of chance and necessity with no end in view) and psychology (God is just wish-fulfillment) I came around to the sentiment that there was no sense in having faith. No one really provided me with any alternatives at the time.

My trouble with God as that my life seemed so unfair, but I oddly enough I never questioned of where this sense of justice within me arose. Not only was my life an injustice, but others’ lives also seemed so unfair, the world that God was supposedly sovereignty controlling was a mess, and I had been given what I believed were scientific and rational reasons to reject God.

The funny thing about it was that I presupposing infinite knowledge was possible by claiming there is no god. Despite my claims, I couldn’t prove that there was no god, as if I had comprehensive knowledge of the entire universe.  So in one sense I was positing omniscience while denying the Omniscient one at the same time.

I feel as though I was a very consistent atheist, as far as that is actually possible. I say that because I was very nihilistic.  Nothing was particularly right or wrong, because morality had no real basis. There was no point in being moral for the sake of convention, I would act in whatever way served my best interests at the moment. It didn’t help that I was re-enforcing my nihilistic views with gangster rap, either. This led to a very grim outlook on life, and because of that I self-medicated myself with drugs, particularly with weed.

My friends were all into the gangster culture, which is sort of funny because we were mostly white kids living in the suburbs. There was a low-income housing project in the county I lived in, and some of the inner-city gangs flocked to the area to sell drugs, and they started making an impression on some of the youngsters in the neighborhood. I befriended these people through an association from high school. While violence between other social groups occasionally broke out, we were hardly gang-bangers. We were really a pack of hooligans looking to get high and have fun.  (Can I use the word hooligan?)

I was very hostile to anyone who tried to preach the gospel to me. I had several people try and talk to me, ironically some of which were among the people I partied with. Because their lifestyle was inconsistent with their message, I told them where they could stick their gospel. To me, it was all an illusion for the weak; fairy tales and myths.

After about two years of this, and seeing my friends lives getting more out of control, I began to re-consider my worldview. There had to be more to life than just satisfying my pride and mental and physical cravings. And it couldn’t be through just finding meaning in work and family, either, as demonstrated by the brokenness that I saw in the lives of the parents of my friends, and in my family.  The knowledge of God was something I was suppressing. I didn’t want to accept that there was a God because I really didn’t want to be accountable for my behavior. But if we were not here by accident, how then should I live and why?

No matter how much I tried to deny morality, I couldn’t make it really compatible with naturalism, (although I know plenty of people try to find a way to squeeze it in).  And were all these people who claimed to find meaning in God really just deluding themselves, or was there something more to it?

to be continued

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6 thoughts on “How I became a Christian – Part 2

  1. Hey, Erik…

    PAH9 misses you. Just kidding… I really hope you continue blogging here. Noticed on facebook that you list yourself as Pentecostal… I was raised within the Assembly of God denomination (very close to Pentecostal if you’re unfamiliar) and my family is still very rooted within that tradition. I’ll be interested to learn about your transition from Catholicism to Atheism to Pentecostalism… that is if you decide to write about it anyways.

    • Thanks, Andy. I still plan on writing at PAH9 when I get inspired. Nothing has really interested me baseball-wise, but once the hot stove season starts, watch out.

      Actually, when I ID myself as a Pentecostal, it’s not Oneness Pentecostal. Maybe I should change it. What I mean Pentecostalism in general – viz.- the gifts of the Spirit are still with us today. My beliefs are thoroughly trinitarian. My church isn’t affiliated with a denomination but most of our beliefs are in line with the AG.

      • Because of my familial upbringing, I’m always intrigued when meeting someone who considers their faith to be closely tied to Pentecostal/AG teaching. I no longer identify with that denomination but remain very interested in theological issues and attend church pretty regularly.

        If I’m not reading about baseball, I’m reading about religion. Kind of funny to find that we have this in common.

        Lastly, I’d like to propose that you change the name of this blog to Pray A Hard Nine.

  2. Pray a Hard Nine? Winner!

    Yeah, it is weird we share so much in common. So what caused you to change your mind regarding the AG teaching? (I can probably think of a few things, but I’m just wondering)

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